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Tuesday, May 20, 2008
Perspectives

McCain: Colombia FTA Benefits U.S.

Congress can find time to pass a pork-filled farm bill, but it cannot stir itself to support a key ally and further American prosperity.
Senator John McCain: Delaying approval of the Colombian FTA will divide us from our Colombian partners at a time when they are battling the FARC terrorists and their allied drug cartels. (Photo: JohnMcCain.com)

BY JOHN McCAIN


For decades, in Republican and Democratic administrations alike, the United States has treated Latin America as a junior partner rather than as a neighbor, like a little brother rather than as an equal. As a resident of a state that borders Mexico, I am acutely aware of the extraordinary contributions that our neighbors make to the United States – from trade to culture to a commitment to democracy and human rights. Latin America today is increasingly vital to the fortunes of the United States, and Americans north and south share a common geography and a common destiny. It is time to embrace this destiny for the benefit of all our peoples.

We have made progress toward this vision by expanding the benefits of free commerce, through NAFTA, the Central American Free Trade Agreement, and our free trade agreements with Peru and Chile. But the progress has stalled; our longstanding bipartisan commitment to hemispheric prosperity is crumbling. We see this most vividly in Barack Obama's and Hillary Clinton's opposition to the free trade agreement with Colombia. The failure of the Congress to take up and approve this agreement is a reminder why 80 percent of Americans think we are on the wrong track. Congress can find time to pass a pork-filled farm bill, but it cannot stir itself to support a key ally and further American prosperity.

The Colombia FTA would benefit American workers and consumers – the U.S. International Trade Administration estimates that over $1 billion in tariffs have been imposed on U.S. exports to Colombia since the FTA was signed, tariffs that would be eliminated once the agreement takes effect. ...In Florida, trade has created new markets for the Sunshine State's world-class produce, manufactured goods, and professional services. Florida's exports to Canada and Mexico rose by some 208 percent since NAFTA was enacted, and its exports to Chile grew 99 percent in the first four years of its free trade agreement. Colombia today stands as Florida's fifth largest export market – Florida exported $2.1 billion worth of goods there last year – and now the Colombians are offering to drop their barriers to American goods. Yet Senators Obama and Clinton oppose the agreement, wishing to retreat behind protectionist walls and undermine a key hemispheric ally.

The strategic implications of rejecting this agreement are profound. Colombia is a beacon of hope in a region where the Castro brothers, Hugo Chavez, and others are actively seeking to thwart economic progress and democracy. Delaying approval of the Colombian Free Trade Agreement will not create one American job or start one American business, but it will divide us from our Colombian partners at a time when they are battling the FARC terrorists and their allied drug cartels. It will undercut America's standing with our allies in a critical region and across the world, at a moment when rebuilding these relationships has never been more important. It will set back the goal of deepening relations with our neighbors to the south and enhancing the stability, peace, and prosperity of our hemisphere.

If I am elected president, the United States will not bow to the special interests seeking to block progress. Instead, we will forge a new policy toward Latin America and the Caribbean Basin, one founded on peace and security, shared prosperity, democracy and freedom, and mutual respect. We will work to prevent Venezuela and Bolivia from taking the same road to failure Castro has paved for Cuba, and we will broaden and strengthen ties with key states like Brazil, Peru, and Chile. We will make clear to all countries in the region that if they share our values of freedom and openness, they can count on us as a friend. We will not abandon our partners to demagogues, drug lords, and despair, but expand the benefits of security, trade and prosperity to all.

John McCain is a U.S. Senator and the presumptive Republican presidential candidate. This column is based on remarks prepared for delivery in Miami, Florida on May 20.

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From: ND-Econ-Prof

Kansas City
Tariffs are not the only barrier to free trade with Colombia. In the early 20th century monopolists drove out competition by offering products below cost. Once competitors were out of business, monopolists would then raise prices back up again.The practice of selling below cost is called “dumping.” “Anti-dumping” laws were passed to forbid the practice. Now these laws are being used to prevent Colombia from selling flowers and Mexico from selling tomatoes in the United States. Obviously, Colombia and Mexico can never establish monopolies on these products.Even I can grow flowers and tomatoes. It is ironic that laws that were passed to protect competition are now being misused to suppress it.

From: HAP

DC
Clarification: The term "antidumping" refers to when a foreign company sells its products to the U.S. below fair market value. The fair market value of the product is defined as the comparison of the U.S. price of the product with the price of the product sold in the home market by the foreign producer.

From: Mike Hoover

Irvine, Ca.
i have been to bogota, colombia 5 times since april of last year and the many business people and even my future step-son ask me -why does your government not tell the truth about colombia? just go to the us state dept. website and see they say.

i think our elected officals here in the usa ought to take a good hard look in the mirror before being critics of colombia.

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